We Asked, You Said, We Did

Below are some of the issues we have recently consulted on and their outcomes.

We asked

Kensington and Chelsea Council has launched a Customer Access Strategy aimed at improving the experience residents have when they contact us. We are committed to the strategy and to working together to achieve the ambitions in the strategy. We believe in co-design and want to form this user group to listen to the voices of those representative of the borough.

You said

There were a total of 80 expressions of interest from across the borough. Thank you to everyone who expressed their interest in being part of the user group.

We did

The Service Standards Project team selected members of the user group based on the demographic make-up of the borough to ensure the group is as broadly representative as possible. 

We asked

  • We asked for views on the proposal to amend the current hours of operation of the school street in St Charles Square, outside All Saints Catholic College to between 8am and 8.30am and between 3pm and 3.30pm on Mondays to Fridays inclusive (currently, the restriction applies between 8am and 8.30am and between 2.45pm and 3.15pm on Mondays to Fridays inclusive).  Motor vehicles would be banned from entering the north to south arm of St Charles Square, between the south-eastern kerb-line of St Charles Square (arm adjacent to Nos. 26 and 28 St Charles Square and Nos. 273 and 275 Ladbroke Grove) and the north-western kerb-line of St Charles Square (southernmost west to east arm) during the hours of control.

You said

We had no objections and no letters of support to these proposals.

We did

We have made the traffic order amending the hours of control of the school street outside All Saints Catholic College in the afternoon from between 2.45pm and 3.15pm to between 3pm and 3.30pm, as proposed.

We asked

We asked for views on the proposal to convert RBKC Housing Resident Permit Holders (PBR) bay (parking bay number 6), to RBKC Housing personalised disabled bay (PBR 02) in the 375 Portobello Road housing estate.

You said

We received one objection to the proposal.

We did

We have made the traffic order for the proposed change to the 375 Portobello Road housing estate as originally advertised.

We asked

We asked for views on 49 proposals in the October 2023 Miscellaneous Parking Changes.

You said

We received a total of 24 objections, nine letters of suport and one comment across 11 of the parking proposals.

We did

We have made the traffic order as originally advertised apart from the proposal relating to Oxford Gardens which was dropped in its entirety.  The decision regarding the Kempsford Gardens and Old Brompton Road proposal was again deferred to the February 2024 amendment.

We asked

We asked for your views and feedback of the current outdoor gym at Holland Park including equipment and surfacing options. The consultation also sought to gather feedback on the golf practice area and pétanque court within Holland Park.

You said

There were 66 survey responses.

General Outdoor gym:

How often people used the outdoor gym in Holland Park:  A total of 14 respondents said they use the outdoor gym equipment everyday, 28 respondents two to three times per week, ten respondents once a week, two respondents once a month, three respondents rarely and eight respondents never use the outdoor gym, and one respondent did not answer.

Satisfaction levels with the outdoor gym equipment: 43 respondents were either very satisfied or satisfied, seven respondents were neither satisfied or dissatisfied,  six respondents were either dissatisfied or very dissatisfied and two respondents did not answer.

Outdoor gym improvements:

Which pieces of strength training equipment you use in the current outdoor gym:  37 respondents used the Chest Press, 37 respondents used the Pulldown Exerciser respondents, 31 respondents used the Leg Press, nine respondents used the Strength Wheel, 12 respondents did not use this equipment or did not answer.

Which pieces of Cardiovascular equipment you use in the current outdoor gym: 27 respondents used the Rower, 24 respondents used the Surfer, 19 respondents used the Skier, 16 respondents used the Pedal Bike, 12 respondents used the Arm and Pedal Bike, and 21 respondents did not use the equipment or did not answer.

Which pieces of Calisthenics/ upper body equipment you use in the current outdoor gym:  40 respondents used the Parallel Bars, 38 respondents used the Triple Pull Up Bars, 34 respondents used the Monkey Bars, 32 respondents used the Sit Up Benches, 32 respondents used the Gym Combination, and eight respondents did not use the equipment or did not answer.

Which pieces of Lower body/full body equipment you use in the current outdoor gym: 28 respondents used the Space walker, 26 respondents the balance beams, 25 respondents the Body Twister, 24 respondents the Agility bench, 24 respondents used the Hurdles, 19 respondents the Four Wheel Spinner, 11 respondents used the Accessible Combo unit, and seven respondents did not use this equipment or did not answer.

Which pieces of Flexibility equipment you use in the current outdoor gym: 20 respondents used the Workout posts, 20 respondents used the Horseback Rider, ten respondents used the Roller Back Massager and 24 respondents  did not use this equipment or did not answer.

Which new pieces or additional outdoor gym equipment people would like to see included in the refurbishment: 17 respondents would like different height/ more pull up bars, eight respondents more Strength/toning equipment, eight respondents suggested an additional training area/equipment or repairs, eight respondents wanted straight Monkey Bars, five respondents wanted a covered area/even surfacing, four respondents safety/storage suggestions and three respondents were satisfied with equipment.

Which type of equipment/method of training you would like to see implemented: 51 respondents supported option 1 – A combination of fitness equipment and calisthenics, nine respondents supported option 2 – A variety of fitness equipment only and six respondents did not answer.

If you supported replacing the current grass mat surfacing with rubber mulch surfacing under the equipment: 42 respondents  supported rubber mulch surfacing, five respondents did not support rubber mulch surfacing and 19 respondents did not know or did not answer.

Golf Practice area:

How often people used the golf practice area in Holland Park: Four respondents used the facility two to three times per week, one respondent once a week, one respondent once a month, seven respondents rarely, 46 respondents never used it, and seven respondents did not answer.

Satisfaction levels with the Golf Practice area: Five respondents were very satisfied or satisfied, five respondents were neither satisfied or dissatisfied and three respondents were dissatisfied.

How could the Golf Practice area be improved: Eight respondents shared their ideas which included enlarging the artificial putting green, new nets, mats and a bunker area, maintenance issues fence repairs, unstable bench, replacement of cracked cups/flag sticks and hire clubs and extended opening hours.

Pétanque Court:

How often people used the pétanque court:  Five respondents used the area every day, six respondents two to three times per week, two respondents once a week, three respondents once a month, five respondents rarely and 45 respondents never use it or did not answer.

What do you use the pétanque court for: 11 respondents use the area for other exercise activity ( e.g., boxing, stretching and squats), four respondents use the area for personal training and three respondents use the area for playing pétanque.

Satisfaction levels with the pétanque court: Eight respondents were very satisfied or satisfied, eleven respondents were neither satisfied or dissatisfied and three respondents were either dissatisfied or very dissatisfied.

Any other ideas or suggestion for improvements: 13 respondents had no further comments, six respondents had comments relating to the pétanque court which included (basketball hoop, table tennis table, covering the area with something waterproof), six respondents commented on other areas/features, four respondents on tennis/racquet sports, three respondents on maintenance/surfacing, three respondents accessibility/cost comments and three respondents’ comments on signage.

We did

Outdoor Gym:

The outdoor gym will be refurbished, the improvements will include the preferred training method of a range of fitness equipment and calisthenics. The popular items of equipment with at least 15 plus responses will all be replaced as part of the outdoor gym refurbishment. We will also look at including additional pull up bars at various heights and new strength and toning equipment. The grass matting safety surface will be replaced with rubber much. The layout of the outdoor gym will be improved to create fitness zones according to type of equipment e.g., cardio zone. Some accessible equipment will also be included in the design. If possible and within budget, we will also include a covered area/shelter for bag and clothing storage and to shelter from the rain and sun. Signage will be added about age use limitations for the equipment.

Golf Practice Area:

The maintenance issues such as the fencing, unstable bench replacement cracked cups/flag sticks and clubs will be improved/replaced. We will also look at the improvement to the nets, artificial putting green and mats.

Pétanque Area:

This is currently used for a variety of activities including some people playing pétanque and an exercise and stretching area. This area will remain unchanged for the time being and we will review this again once the work to the outdoor gym and golf practice areas are completed.

 

The improvements will be carried out late Spring to early Summer 2024.

We asked

We asked for your views on improving Tavistock Gardens, by giving your thoughts on the current facilities, as well as ideas for improvement. Specifically, we asked for your opinions on the types and quantities of planting, fencing, lighting and CCTV in the gardens.

We also asked whether you would like to see the “Hand off Mangrove” sculpture garden installed within this open space.

Finally, we sought your interest in volunteering to help plant some of the new shrubs.

You said

We received 89 responses to the survey.

Who took part: Most respondents were female, at 58 percent, and all were above 25 years old. 25 percent of respondents reported a physical or mental health condition that was expected to last 12 months or more. 67 percent of respondents described their ethnic origin as white.

How people use the gardens: Just over half of respondents visit the garden at least two to three times per week. Just over half say they use the gardens for sitting, relaxing, walking and/or light exercise. Just over one third meet friends and around a quarter walk a dog or use the playground. One in five eat in the gardens and 16 percent use the gym equipment.

Satisfaction with the gardens: Most residents were satisfied with the trees at 61 percent. This was followed by satisfaction with paths at 43 percent and peace and quiet at 38 percent. Dissatisfaction was highest for the lawn area and cleanliness at 49 percent, seating 47 percent and shrub beds 45 percent. The most common sited complaints were for the maintenance of shrub and lawn areas, lack of seating, anti-social behaviour, dog fouling and rubbish.

Suggested planting: Most residents would like to see wildflowers to attract birds and butterflies, colourful plants of all year interest and sensory plants such as herbs and ornamental grasses. Just over a third also supported plants that produce edible fruit, such as fruit trees.

Provide more: Half of residents would like to see more trees, shrubs and seating in the gardens. 55 percent would like the same amount of lawn or less.

Fencing along Tavistock Road: Nearly half of respondents supported additional fencing, with just over a quarter ‘neutral’ and just under a quarter opposed. Of those opposed, ‘not needed’ was the most common reason.

Street lighting: 42 percent support additional lighting in the gardens, with 35 percent opposed. Of those opposed, ‘not needed’ was the most common reason.

CCTV in the gardens: Nearly two thirds of respondents supported more CCTV in the gardens, with only 16 percent opposed

General comments: The most common comments were for more flowers, colour and wildlife in the gardens.

Hands off Mangrove sculpture: 44 percent of respondents supported the sculpture garden, with just over one third ‘neutral’ and one in five opposed. Of those opposed, concerns about too much space being used was the most common.

Volunteering: 35 percent of respondents would like to volunteer planting new shrubs in the gardens.

We did

Trees and shrubs: We will replant shrub beds with small trees and shrubs to attract birds and butterflies, and plants providing all year-round colour. Shrub beds will be protected by low-level bow-top fencing. Where conditions allow, we will also plant herbs and small fruit trees. Herbs can be grown within the planters proposed at the main entrance to the gardens, where there is more sunlight. There is support for more planting, which can be accommodated within planters and around the sculpture garden.

Seating: There is support for more seating within the gardens. Taking into account a relatively high number of users of the gardens with a physical mobility condition, these seats will have sturdy backs and armrests for extra support.

Fencing: There is support for fencing along Tavistock Road, and this will be provided to match the height and style of fencing along All Saints Road. Protective low-level fencing will also be installed in front of shrub beds, as mentioned above. There are no plans to lock the gardens at night.

Street lighting: There is some support for additional street lighting within the gardens and this will be further explored where there are ‘dark spots’.

CCTV in the gardens: There is strong support for extra CCTV in the gardens and this will be progressed to discourage anti-social behaviour.

Other concerns: Concerns raised about rubbish, dog fouling and maintenance will be forwarded to the Parks Team, who manage the grounds maintenance contract, and the RBKC Parks Police, who support in controlling anti-social behaviour. Low bow-top railings around the shrub borders and the fence on Tavistock road should help to address some of these issues, particularly around dog fouling and litter in shrub borders.

“Hands off Mangrove” Sculpture Garden: There is support for the new sculpture garden and this will be installed. NCIL funding has already been secured to help with the costs. Concerns about the sculpture garden taking up too much space will be acknowledged by ensuring that planting around the sculpture does not take up too much of the lawn area.

Volunteering: Volunteers will be invited to help plant up some of the shrub beds in the spring 2024.

We asked

We asked for views on the proposal to prohibit all buses (including coaches) from entering Oakley Street or Old Church Street (between the south-eastern kerb-line of King’s Road and the north-western kerb-line of Chelsea Embankment), excluding any part of those roads that is a red route side road. An exemption will apply to vehicles following a diversion route.

You said

  • We had four objections and a total of 83 letters of support to these proposals.

We did

We have made the traffic order prohibiting all buses (including coaches) from entering Oakley Street or Old Church Street (between the south-eastern kerb-line of King’s Road and the north-western kerb-line of Chelsea Embankment), excluding any part of those roads that is a red route side road. An exemption will apply to vehicles following a diversion route., as proposed.

We asked

If the Council should introduce ten new cycle hangars in nine locations across the borough.

You said

73 responses supported the proposals in full, 7 supported in part and 32 objected to the proposals. 

We did

The Director for Transport and Regulatory Services, in consultation with the Lead Member for Planning, Place and Environment, has decided to proceed with the  hangars proposed in Bolton Gardens, Earl's Court Square (three units), Ladbroke Grove, Powis Square and Princedale Road.   The ward councillors have asked that the units proposed in Egerton Terrace and Whitehead’s Grove not proceed, and officers consider that the number of objections from residents suggest that the community do not wish to see this hangar installed in Stanley Gardens.

We asked

Panel Members were invited to attend an in person event in October 2023 to discuss the theme ‘Making the borough fairer’. This was one of a number of engagement events to help develop the themes and actions for inclusion in the Council’s new Equality, Diversity, and Inclusion Action Plan. 

The event was attended by Councillors and senior managers within the Council (including the Chief Executive) and Panel members were incited to join a discussion table to address the following questions:  

  • What does becoming a fairer Kensington and Chelsea mean to you?
  • What should the Council do to address equalities and fairness in the borough?
  • What are the three things we should focus on first to make Kensington and Chelsea a fairer place?
  • How can we work with our communities to make this happen?

You said

Panel members raised a range of issues relating to fairness including health inequalities, community safety, housing, young people and education, the cost of living and the need for more consultation and involvement.

Some of key ideas raised for addressing equality and fairness in the borough included:

  • More support for parents and families and educational support for young people
  • A need for more affordable housing and to ensure existing housing stock is maintained to a good standard
  • A need for improved customer service from the Council and for all residents to be treated equally and respectfully.
  • A need to work more with local communities and to provide more localised services where people live
  • The need for more communication and transparency from the Council especially with regard to decision making and accountability
  • The need to listen more to residents and involve them to better understand who lives in the borough, their lived experiences and to connect more with the community.

We did

Thank you those who attended the Citizen's Panel event in the Autumn on developing a Fairer borough. Theses inputs have been utilised, alongside other engagement with residents, to develop draft priorities and themes for the new Fairer Action Plan, aimed at tackling inequality, celebrating diversity and promoting inclusion. We are currently working with council teams to develop the practical actions and commitments that will support each of these themes, utilising the feedback from our communities and the data available about inequality in the borough. We will be consulting with residents over the coming months on the draft themes and areas of focus before finalising the later this year.

We asked

We sought local residents' views on Ifield Road Playground play equipment, surfacing and planting, as due to be renewed.

You said

We received back twenty-two responses with preferences expressed for each item due to be renewed.

We did

Following the consultation, tendering process started in November and saw HAGS SMP Ltd been awarded the works in the playground (including installation of both junior and toddler swings, climbing frame, hanging bars, slides, trampoline, spinning item, items of inclusive equipment, sensory play items and bright colours). This closely matches the design brief and consultation feedback.

We asked

One of the Council’s responsibilities is to protect and improve the mental health and wellbeing of our residents and their communities. We asked for your feedback on:

  • Your current emotional wellbeing
  • What factors impacts on this, both positively and negatively
  • What you do to support your own wellbeing
  • Knowledge and experience of mental health services
  • What you would like to see more of in the community, and
  • What you would like to see included in a digital mental health resource.

Learning about your emotional wellbeing and mental health experiences helps us to shape our services to better meet your emotional wellbeing needs and those of your loved ones.

You said

We recieved 324 responses to this, the demographics of respondents were:

  • 60 per cent female, 39 per cent male
  • 76 per cent White, 22 per cent Black, Asian or Multi-ethnic
  • 10 per cent 18-24 year olds, 46 per cent 35-59, 42 percent 60 and over

Emotional health and wellbeing: Almost half (47 per cent) of respondents stated they had felt anxious to some extent over the preceding two weeks (providing a score of 5 or above). 40 per cent stated they had felt low/depressed. Factors that had the most positive impact on respondents’ emotional health and wellbeing were their relationships with friends/family and their home. Physical health and financial situation were the factors that had the most negative impact.

Activities to support wellbeing​: The most popular activities undertaken by respondents were ‘going for a walk/other physical activity’ (79 per cent) and ‘spending time with family and friends’ (69 per cent).Almost two thirds (64 per cent) of respondents reported that they either ‘mostly’ or ‘always’ managed to undertake 30 minutes of moderate activity five times a week. Sixteen per cent reported that they ‘never’ or ‘almost never’ managed to do this. 

Local facilities​: The majority of respondents reported having a GP surgery (84 per cent), park or open space (90 per cent), library (80 per cent) or sports/leisure facility (68 per cent) within a 15-minute walk from where they lived.Only 12 per cent reported having a family hub 15 minutes’ walk away. 

Mental Health Services​: Approximately half (51 per cent) of respondents stated they would know where to go for help if they (or a loved one) were having a mental health crisis, whilst 31 per cent felt there were not enough local mental health and wellbeing services available to meet their community’s needs. Of those who had accessed mental health services, over a quarter (26 per cent) reported finding it either ‘difficult’ or ‘very difficult’ to access the support they needed. Suggestions for improving access to mental health support included: more communication/ promotion, increasing services available and reducing waiting lists/times. 

The services which respondents wanted to see more of within their community to support mental health and wellbeing were talking therapies (57 per cent) followed by culturally appropriate services to meet local needs (33 per cent). Information which respondents wanted to see included in a mental health digital resource were lists of local services (76 per cent), locations of local services (70 per cent) and NHS services available (62 per cent). 

We did

Please note these are planned initiatives following the Panel survey, we will update Panel members on progress as a later date.

To develop our comprehensive mental health campaign (including mental health training) and an enhanced digital platform to include the learning from the Citizen’s Panel, we will:

  • Utilise our community champions, community health and wellbeing workers, libraires and GPs to run a campaign for residents about how to manage anxiety
  • Promote services and health messages within the community with high footfall for men and younger residents including: gyms, pubs and barbers. 
  • Work with the Equalities Board and Kensington and Chelsea Social Council to develop culturally competent communications strategies.
  • Target our mental health training offer to local SME and VCS organisations
  • Promote the Cost of Living Hub and include links to debt advice support within the mental health digital platform and as a discussion point in the training programme. 
  • Review and update mental health services information and messages on Kensington and Chelsea website and KCNet.
  • Launch of the Children and Young People Mental Health and Wellbeing Campaign “You Got This”.

Enhance local mental health services

  • Work with our local account group and community champions to review pathways into mental health services
  • Utilise our VCS workforce to develop system wide culturally competent services
  • Upskill VCS organisations to deliver a range of culturally competent services
  • Review self-help and peer support offer available via Community Living Well Talking Therapies services
  • Commissioning Mental Health awareness and prevention training to VSOs and communities in RBKC to build community resilience.

We asked

We asked for your views on a wide range of improvements to Sunbeam Gardens. The potential improvements included:

  • Installation of a drinking water fountain
  • New seating
  • Art sculpture and mural
  • Repainting existing railings
  • New planting
  • Outdoor gym equipment

You said

Survey responses 25

General:

How often people visit the park:  A total of 10 respondents said they visit Sunbeam Gardens everyday, 4 respondents visited two to three times per week, 7 respondents visited once a week and 4 respondents less frequently.

Satisfaction levels with the park: 10 respondents were either very satisfied or satisfied, 9 respondents were neither satisfied or dissatisfied, 5 respondents were either dissatisfied or very dissatisfied and 1 respondent did not answer.

Improvement proposals: Respondents were asked for the levels of support for each of the proposal and then asked to rank them in order of preference. The top two selected items in order of preference in joint 1st place were the installation of a new drinking water fountain and planting improvements both with a mean score of 1.28, 2nd  place was additional items of outdoor gym equipment with a mean score of 0.96, 3rd place new benches with arm rests with a mean score of 0.64, 4th place repainting external railings with a mean score of 0.60, 5th sculpture with a mean score of 0.56 and 6th ground mural with a mean score of 0.08.

Top two preferred pieces of outdoor gym equipment: The top two favourite pieces of equipment selected were the resistance stepper and resistance shoulder press.

Preferred Planting theme: Eleven respondents said that they would like a mixed planting theme including plants beneficial to wildlife and pollinators, shrubs and grasses, seasonal bulbs, and sensory planting.  9 respondents just wanted plants beneficial to wildlife and pollinators.

Installation of picnic tables of grass area outside play area:  17 respondents were in favour of this, 7 respondents did not support this and 1 respondent did not answer.

 

We did

Improvements

  • The joint 1st ranked items of new and improved planting and installation of a drinking water fountain will be implemented. The new planting will include new climbing planting to the boundary of the play area and seasonal bulbs, some infill planting around the boundary of the rest of the site including some new trees and fruiting plants. It will follow the preferred mixed planting theme incorporating plants beneficial to wildlife and pollinators, ornamental shrubs and grasses, seasonal bulbs, and sensory planting. 
  • The two new pieces of outdoor gym equipment will also be installed to include the two favourite pieces the resistance stepper and resistance shoulder press, we will also look to replace the existing pull up bars at the same time as these now require replacement.
  • The benches will also be replaced with timber park benches with back and armrests and one accessible picnic table installed.
  • The park railing repainting will be carried out subject to available budget, but we will commit to repaint all 4 entrance gates and the railings around the children’s play area.

The installation of new sculpture and the ground mural were the least supported and options and received the lowest ranking votes and will therefore not be considered further.

The improvements will be carried out over the autumn/winter period, and we hope that all the works will be completed by March/ April 2024.

We asked

We asked for views on the proposals to make changes to the parking layout in the Elm Park Gardens, Henry Dickens Court, Knight’s House, Longlands Court, 375 Portobello Road and Tavistock Crescent housing estates.

You said

We received a total of five objections, no letters of support and no comments across three of the off-street parking proposals.

We did

We have made the traffic order for the proposed changes in Elm Park Gardens, Henry Dickens Court, Knight’s House, Longlands Court, 375 Portobello Road and Tavistock Crescent housing estates as originally advertised.

We asked

We asked for views on 66 proposals in the June 2023 Miscellaneous Parking Changes, and a proposed clerical change relating that the maximum permitted vehicle dimensions, in respect of applications for residents’ permits and disabled persons’ purple badges for vehicles adapted for use by disabled persons.

You said

We received a total of 37 objections, nine letters of support and two comments across 18 of the parking proposals.

We did

We have made the traffic order as originally advertised apart from the proposals relating to Campden Street, Holland Park, Holland Street and Pottery Lane which were dropped in their entirety.  Two of the three proposals in Cremorne Estate were also dropped, the Campden Grove proposal was amended to one metre.  The decision regarding the Kempsford Gardens and Old Brompton Road proposal was deferred to the October 2023 amendment.

We asked

The Council consulted residents and users of information, advice and guidance services to understand their experiences of using them.

You said

An online survey and in person discussion took place to gather views, a summary of findings can be seen below:

Experience of information, advice and guidance services

  • Around a half of survey respondents, using services, felt staff were helpful, the advice was of a high quality and had helped move their issue forward
  • However, almost half of survey respondents, using services, did not feel it was easy to get an appointment
  • Some residents attending the feedback event felt that the varied schedule of services across the borough made them hard to access
  • Some residents attending the in-person event also reported that it is very hard to get through to services on the telephone

Support and accessing support

  • Survey respondents felt the issues that they might need information, advice and guidance to address were: Housing, welfare benefits and social care.
  • The most commonly selected issues that survey respondents might need support with were advice on legal matters and medical or health support.
  • When asked about the frequency of support they might need, monthly support and quarterly support were most selected by survey respondents
  • Residents attending the feedback event would like to see private rooms introduced for appointments and walk ins
  • Residents attending the event called for regular caseworkers and the storage of personal documents, so residents do not have to explain their issue multiple times
  • The importance of understanding cultural and demographic needs in local areas was stressed at the in person event

We did

The feedback provided by residents has been used to inform the tender specification for the procurement of information, advice and guidance services for Kensington and Chelsea.

We asked

Do the Bi-Borough learning disabilities supported living services prioritise person-centred care, promote independence, community inclusion and improve quality of life of service users and their families? 

 

We asked you to tell us your views and experience of these services to ensure that your views are heard, and your preferences are incorporated in our service design and implemented in our service delivery. The survey and engagement event questions were based on the following themes:  

  • Overall satisfaction level with the supported living services.
  • Housing environment and feeling safe in building and home.  
  • Person-centred care and co-production that promotes independence, skill development and community inclusion.  
  • Maintaining physical and mental health and wellbeing.  
  • Clear and accessible complaints procedure.  

You said

63 service users and family members responded to the survey and attended the engagement events, and we gathered valuable insight into the services. Most service users said they feel safe in their homes/buildings (19 respondents out of 24) and stated that their homes/buildings are clean and tidy (21 respondents out of 24). Service users also said that support staff help keep their home clean and tidy and receive person-centred care, which supports them in maintaining their independence, physical and mental health, and well-being.

During the engagement session with carers, it was found that most carers are satisfied with the supported living service’s homes/buildings. However, six carers said that they are ‘very dissatisfied’ or ‘dissatisfied’ with the service for assorted reasons, including noise pollution, delays in repairs, poor communication, and staff skills, and family members expressed concerns with the cleanliness and maintenance of properties. Professionals suggested using assistive technology to promote safety in the homes/buildings of the service users.

The service user survey shows that most respondents said they have a support plan (21 respondents). On the other hand, most service users who attended the engagement sessions said they do not know what is in their support plan and want it in an accessible format, such as verbal and visual communication and easy-read materials. Carers were satisfied with the support plans provided for their loved ones, though they mentioned some issues with communication among staff when it came to implementing the plans.

Professionals stated during the events that no official complaint pathway is followed, but complaints are raised informally. Careers also mentioned that they are not aware of the complaints process or procedure or have seen copies of policies. On the other hand, most service users who responded to the survey said it is easy to get help when support is bad (22 respondents out of 24).  

We did

Place further emphasis on promoting empowerment and focusing on each service users’ strengths and achievable targets and using person-centred support to ensure independence is maximised and risks are controlled. We will continue to improve our supported living offer by measuring the quality of outcomes, promoting good practice and empowering service users by engaging with service users, family members, advocacy services and related professionals. We will do this by working in partnership with service providers, health partners and community organisations to deliver tangible person-centred care that is co-produced and user lead. 

We will evaluate the property environment and support service providers to address concerns relating to property maintenance and repairs with landlords to ensure a safe, welcoming, comfortable, and homely environment.  

We will foster trust in our service users and their family members by demonstrating commitment to providing high-quality supported living services, through an ongoing process of improvement and collaboration with service users, family members, advocacy services, health and social care professionals and wider community services. 

We will review our future survey design to influence a higher response to survey questions and feedback engagement to ensure that we actively engage with service users and their families to build trust, explain the importance of their feedback, and show them how their feedback has led to improvements in service delivery. 

Our services are expected to use a person-centred approach to maximise the choice and decision-making ability of individuals they support in relation to their lifestyle, needs and wishes and co-production and partnership working is a key principle in all aspects of our service delivery. We will closely monitor services to ensure that these principles are being met and support plans are co-produced and made available in an accessible format for the service user 

We recognise the key role of family members in supporting service users to have as much independence as possible and understand that family members might also need support themselves in fulfilling this. 

Our services will demonstrate through their policies, procedures and practices their ability and commitment to:  

  • Treat service users as individuals and support their recovery through promoting their dignity, independence, and self-determination. 
  • Respond flexibly to changes in service user’s circumstances.  
  • Consult with service users and their family members and create opportunities for involving them in decision-making. 
  • Achieve a balanced approach to risk which gives service users control and the right to make mistakes without serious implications for their security and safety. 
  • Give fair access and ensure that the service meets the needs of black, and minority ethnic communities. 
  • Focus on assisting service users to realise their potential and aspirations. 
  • Reduce social isolation, promoting social inclusion and community integration, and. 
  • Work with service users to achieve realistic and achievable goals and outcomes. 

We asked

We asked you to tell us your views and experience of these services to ensure that your views are heard, and your preferences are incorporated in our service design and implemented in our service delivery. The survey and engagement event questions were based on the following themes:  

  • Overall satisfaction level with the supported living services.
  • Housing environment and feeling safe in building and home.  
  • Person-centred care and co-production that promotes independence, skill development and community inclusion.  
  • Maintaining physical and mental health and wellbeing.  
  • Clear and accessible complaints procedure.  

You said

63 service users and family members responded to the survey and attended the engagement events, and we gathered valuable insight into the services. Most service users said they feel safe in their homes/buildings (19 respondents out of 24) and stated that their homes/buildings are clean and tidy (21 respondents out of 24). Service users also said that support staff help keep their home clean and tidy and receive person-centred care, which supports them in maintaining their independence, physical and mental health, and well-being. 


During the engagement session with carers, it was found that most carers are satisfied with the supported living service’s homes/buildings. However, six carers said that they are ‘very dissatisfied’ or ‘dissatisfied’ with the service for assorted reasons, including noise pollution, delays in repairs, poor communication, and staff skills, and family members expressed concerns with the cleanliness and maintenance of properties. Professionals suggested using assistive technology to promote safety in the homes/buildings of the service users. 
 
The service user survey shows that most respondents said they have a support plan (21 respondents). On the other hand, most service users who attended the engagement sessions said they do not know what is in their support plan and want it in an accessible format, such as verbal and visual communication and easy-read materials. Carers were satisfied with the support plans provided for their loved ones, though they mentioned some issues with communication among staff when it came to implementing the plans. 
 
Professionals stated during the events that no official complaint pathway is followed, but complaints are raised informally. Careers also mentioned that they are not aware of the complaints process or procedure or have seen copies of policies. On the other hand, most service users who responded to the survey said it is easy to get help when support is bad (22 respondents out of 24).

We did

Place further emphasis on promoting empowerment and focusing on each service users’ strengths and achievable targets and using person-centred support to ensure independence is maximised and risks are controlled. We will continue to improve our supported living offer by measuring the quality of outcomes, promoting good practice and empowering service users by engaging with service users, family members, advocacy services and related professionals. We will do this by working in partnership with service providers, health partners and community organisations to deliver tangible person-centred care that is co-produced and user lead. 

We will evaluate the property environment and support service providers to address concerns relating to property maintenance and repairs with landlords to ensure a safe, welcoming, comfortable, and homely environment.  

We will foster trust in our service users and their family members by demonstrating commitment to providing high-quality supported living services, through an ongoing process of improvement and collaboration with service users, family members, advocacy services, health and social care professionals and wider community services. 

We will review our future survey design to influence a higher response to survey questions and feedback engagement to ensure that we actively engage with service users and their families to build trust, explain the importance of their feedback, and show them how their feedback has led to improvements in service delivery. 

Our services are expected to use a person-centred approach to maximise the choice and decision-making ability of individuals they support in relation to their lifestyle, needs and wishes and co-production and partnership working is a key principle in all aspects of our service delivery. We will closely monitor services to ensure that these principles are being met and support plans are co-produced and made available in an accessible format for the service user 

We recognise the key role of family members in supporting service users to have as much independence as possible and understand that family members might also need support themselves in fulfilling this. 

Our services will demonstrate through their policies, procedures and practices their ability and commitment to:  

  • Treat service users as individuals and support their recovery through promoting their dignity, independence, and self-determination. 
  • Respond flexibly to changes in service user’s circumstances.  
  • Consult with service users and their family members and create opportunities for involving them in decision-making. 
  • Achieve a balanced approach to risk which gives service users control and the right to make mistakes without serious implications for their security and safety. 
  • Give fair access and ensure that the service meets the needs of black, and minority ethnic communities. 
  • Focus on assisting service users to realise their potential and aspirations. 
  • Reduce social isolation, promoting social inclusion and community integration, and
  • Work with service users to achieve realistic and achievable goals and outcomes. 

We asked

We asked you to express your views on the draft Health and Wellbeing Strategy and its principles and ambitions through a survey and 16 engagement sessions across Kensington and Chelsea and Westminster boroughs

You said

  • Almost two-thirds of survey respondents agree with the Principles proposed in the Strategy draft.
  • Almost three-quarters of survey respondents agree with the ten Ambitions proposed
  • Survey respondents thought that the approach outlined in the Strategy will not adversely affect certain groups more than others.
  • During the engagement sessions, attendees expressed some positive thoughts around the Ambitions but they underlined missing areas or areas of improvement such as: SEND needs, poor housing, health education, mental health, seldom heard, digital exclusion and healthcare system efficiency.
  • Also, we heard attendees of the engagement sessions expressing particular interest on inclusion of seldom heard through extra support (digital inclusion etc.)
     
    Responses were analysed to inform and reflect your views in the Strategy delivery.

We did

Residents’ views were taken into account to inform the Strategy that launched on 5 October with particular focus on young people, inequalities and involving communities as raised in this consultation.

We asked

We asked residents local residents for their views on Council proposals to improve the streetscape around Gloucester Road.

You said

The majority of respondents supported the proposals, although a number of comments and suggestions for improvement were made.

We did

Following consultation with the local community we are proposing to make some modifications to the initial proposals to address concerns raised and we are currently preparing a Key Decision Report for approval of the revised scheme.

In addition to the public realm proposals which were the focus of the consultation, the scheme also involves improvements to the signal controlled junctions at each end. We are currently working with Transport for London (TfL) on the design for these two junctions.

The next stage will be to develop designs for the plaza area outside the station and the area on the west side of the Cromwell Road junction where we propose to remove the existing left turn filter lane. Construction is unlikely to start until Autumn 24, subject to approvals.

We asked

Whether advisory cycle lanes should be introduced on Fulham Road and the eastern and western sections of Kensington High Street.

You said

We had 1,775 responses to the consultation. Around 66 per cent of respondents to the consultation supported the measures in full or in part for Kensington High Street. On Fulham Road, around 71 per cent supported the measures in full or in part.

We did

A decision has been confirmed to introduce the scheme in both roads but with an amendment to extend the width of the lanes to two metres wherever possible. This was a recommendation made in a road safety audit.

Work to introduce the Kensington High Street scheme is scheduled to begin on 14 August 2023. The work will take place across three nights, weather permitting, between 9pm and 6am. During the works, we will attempt to keep disruption to a minimum but some minor traffic disruption is likely for a short period. We may also need to temporarily suspend some parking bays in order to complete the works. 

A timeline for Fulham Road will be confirmed at a later date.

To read the decision report in full visit https://rbkc.moderngov.co.uk/Committees/mgIssueHistoryHome.aspx?IId=5889&Opt=0