We Asked, You Said, We Did

Below are some of the issues we have recently consulted on and their outcomes.

We asked

We asked for views on the proposal to order ban on all motor vehicles from entering the length of Elystan Street that lies between the south-eastern kerb-line of Whitehead’s Grove and the north-western kerb-line of Elystan Place.

You said

We had no objections or comments about this proposal.

We did

We have made this scheme permanent.

We asked

We asked for views on the proposals made in the October 2021 Miscellaneous Parking Changes.

You said

We had a total of 30 objections and 25 comments about these proposals.

We did

We amended the proposals for Harcourt Terrace (to reduce the size of the bay) and Uxbridge Street (to make only one of the two sets of changes proposed for Uxbridge St permanent) and approved all the other proposals. We also made permanent previous experimental orders in Elystan Street and Lansdowne Crescent and made permanent a proposal previously advertised in June 2021 in Egerton Gardens and made some changes to the articles of the traffic orders.

We asked

Our second round of consultation on New Homes at Cheyne presented updated proposals which sought to respond to resident feedback provided during the first round of consultation, notably reducing the height and number of floors in the proposed building.

This round also gave residents the chance to express their preferences about some of the design proposals being considered for the site, such as architectural features that could be used on the building and in its surrounding landscape.

You said

What you told us:

  • Strong support for the Nursery and Children’s centre on the site

We welcome and appreciate the local support for the proposed Nursery and Children’s Centre.

  • Concerns about new homes and social housing

We have listened to the concerns raised about providing new homes on the site and considered this alongside feedback from planning officers and other stakeholders.

The intention is to include nine new homes as part of the development which has been reduced from up to 22 homes presented at Round 1. Planning policies encourage the re-use of council sites to provide much needed new homes in the borough. The site is in an accessible location and close to local shops and services, so we think it’s a good site for building new homes.

  • Concerns about the building’s height

The height of the development was reduced in consultation Rounds 1 and 2 from up to seven storeys in the original proposal to four storeys in the latest one: a ground floor level and three storeys above ground. This means that nine new homes are now proposed, rather than up to 22 as was previously proposed.

The four-storey proposal was discussed with the Council’s planning department and the design officer considered it to be an appropriate height in the context of the surrounding area.

  • Concerns about building density in the area

The borough is typically characterised by low to medium rise developments (the definition of which includes developments up to 6 storeys in height) and often in the form of mansion blocks. The proposed development of nine new homes on a site measuring 0.14 hectares, represents a density of 64 homes per hectare. This is much lower than the Chelsea Waterfront development and we think the scale of development is appropriate for this site.

  • Concerns about daylight and sunlight

A detailed technical assessment has been carried out to inform the design of the proposal and a report will be submitted with the planning application.

The technical assessment concludes that nearly all the windows of neighbouring properties tested will comply with the relevant industry guidelines, provided by the Building Research Establishment (BRE). These guidelines are used to assess new developments like this and designed to ensure developments do not have unacceptable impacts.

The assessment concludes that the neighbouring park and the gardens on Thorndike Close will comply with BRE industry guidelines.

  • Concerns about traffic caused by the new development

The new homes will be car free with no parking spaces, in line with the Council’s policy requirements. The local area is highly accessible by bus, and cycle spaces will be provided for the new residents and those who work in and visit the Nursery and Children’s Centre.

Over two thirds of the additional trips will be made on foot or by public transport with the remainder by car or cycle.

Design choices

  • We have incorporated your preference of paving choices into the design
  • Feedback from Round 2 told us that residents and other stakeholders preferred greenery to be incorporated into the façade design. This feature has been enhanced by including evergreens to make sure there will be some greenery all year round. This feature has been praised by the Quality Review Panel in our pre-application discussions.
  • Feedback from Round 2 indicated a preference for a calm internal colour scheme, and the intention is to incorporate this at the detailed design stage. There will be design workshops arranged in the future to discuss the interior design of the Nursery and Children’s Centre.
  • Responses to the red tone brick presented at round 2 have been muted.  In response to this feedback, the design team is continuing to consider options for the tone of brick.

We did

Feedback in response to residents and stakeholders' views, and actions taken, can be read in the 'You Said' section above.

We asked

We asked for your views on two of the playgrounds within Emslie Horniman Pleasance, with the aim of making refurbishments to them using feedback from the community. The consultation was split into 2 phases – initial ideas and feedback, followed by a survey.

You said

Phase 1 (Initial Ideas and Feedback)

Phase 2 (Survey) - 106 responses

Junior Playground (Multi Themed):

  • Satisfaction: A total of 52% were satisfied with the current playground (12% very satisfied, 40% satisfied). Whilst a total of 24% of respondents were dissatisfied (17% dissatisfied, 7% very dissatisfied).
  • Type of Material: A total of 83% of respondents said that they would like the equipment to be made out of wood/timber/natural materials.
  • Seating: A total of 65% of respondents said that there should be more seating and benches within the playground.
  • Top 5 Requested Types of Equipment: Learn and Play, Jumper/Trampoline, Multi-unit/Climbing Frames, Swings and Balancing Equipment.
  • Canopies: 77% of respondents said they felt the canopy (covered area) features should remain within the large playground.
  • Themes: The majority of respondents wanted to have multiple themes throughout the playground.
  • Gates and Fencing: A total of 76% of respondents would like to see improvements made to the entrance gates and perimeter fencing.
  • Mural: The majority (83%) of respondents would like to see a mural within the playground to celebrate local artistry.
  • Other Comments: Make the canopies larger, improve the entrance gate by installing a child lock/self-closing mechanism, and adding more bins.

 

Pathfinder Playground:

  • 76% of respondents said that they would like to see the space remain as a playground area.
  • Types of equipment: A total of 63% of respondents selected Jumper/Trampoline and Multi-unit/Climbing frames as their most preferred. The least popular option was Dynamic/Spinning equipment at 25%.
  • Type of Material: 65% of respondents supported the idea of keeping the equipment in the pathfinder playground with the same natural, timber look.
  • Surfacing: 69% of respondents wanted to see suitable safety surfacing introduced.
  • Other Comments: More seating, make the space more visible, add more bins, and make the space more appealing for older children.

We did

The results will be used to help with the scope of the works, and the council will be working with the community to finalise the designs of the play areas.

We asked

For your views on extending the network of e-Scooter hire scheme parking bays in the borough by introducing an additional 15 bays across the borough

You said

We received a range of comments on 12 of the 15 locations, no location received more than four comments.

We did

In addition to the on-line consultation we undertook a statutory Traffic Management Order consultation on eight of the bays. After considering the comments received from both sources we decided to proceed with installation of all of the bays.

We asked

We asked for views on exempting pedal cycles from the existing one-way traffic systems in Nevern Road (between Nevern Square (north-west arm) and Longridge Road), the north-east arm of Nevern Square (between Nevern Square (north-west arm) and Nevern Square (south-east arm)), the north-west arm of Nevern Square (between Nevern Road and Nevern Square (north-east arm)), on the north-east arm of Nevern Square (between Nevern Square (south-east arm) and Trebovir Road), Park Walk (between Elm Park Road and Fulham Road), Pavilion Road (between Cadogan Gardens (northern arm) and Cadogan Gate) and Trebovir Road (between Warwick Road and Nevern Square (north-east arm)).

You said

We had one objector and one supporter for the proposal for Nevern Road/Nevern Square/Trebovir Road and no comments for the other proposals.

We did

We have made this order and will implement the schemes.

We asked

We asked for your views on the existing playground and ideas for the future with the aim of making improvements using the feedback and ideas from the local community. The consultation was split into two phases; Pre-engagement sessions in the park and a formal survey.

You said

Phase 1 (Pre-engagement sessions in the park)

Phase 2 (Survey) – 36 responses

  • People generally dissatisfied with the playground.
  • Preferred age range for new playground equipment is 5-9 year olds but also support for providing equipment for 1-4 year olds and 10-14 year olds.
  • Preferred activities for the new playground were swings, climbing, bouncing and a slide.
  • Support for providing more seating in the new playground.
  • Support for installing a picnic table in a grass area outside the playground.

We did

The results will be used to help design and construct a new playground.

For more information on the consultation including next steps and a copy of the full report please contact us by email at parksprojects@rbkc.gov.uk or by phone on 07929 850 525.

We asked

The Council held a seven week consultation from 18 August to 7 October 2021 to give as many North Kensington residents the opportunity to have their say and join the conversation about the future of The Curve services and the remaining £1.3M budget from 2022-24.

The community were invited to have their say and vote for their preferred option via an online survey promoted in Council and third-party communication channels throughout the consultation period. A paper copy of the survey was also distributed to 29,000 addresses in seven North Kensington wards.

The consultation asked residents: ‘What would your preference be for the future of the Curve?'

a)         Curve services relocated in another community centre building?

b)         A Curve legacy fund, designed to fund projects that serve the north Kensington community.

c)         A combination of ‘a’ and ‘b’.

d)         Another idea, developed and overseen by the Curve Legacy Steering Group. A free text box was provided for this option, so respondents could write their ideas down and provide contact details.

The fourth option (Option D) gave people the opportunity to put forward their own ideas and suggestions. During the consultation, the Curve Board of Governors put forward their idea of a Community Trust as an idea under this option which was subsequently promoted via an unbranded flyer and distributed to residents in North Kensington.

Using independent specialists

To ensure an unbiased and thorough approach from the outset, the Council appointed independent community engagement specialists.

Incentivising participation

The community were also invited to participate in real world and virtual workshops which were incentivised with a £20 Love2Shop gift voucher to recognise participants' time.

Widening reach to hear from as many North Kensington residents as possible

In addition to the survey and the workshops, this consultation involved community events and engagement at The Curve plus several high footfall locations which provided a broad range of North Kensington residents with multiple opportunities to join the conversation, have their voices heard and have their say about how they would like the future Curve budget to be spent. To reach out to as many North Kensington residents as possible, this consultation was promoted using:

  • Translated copies of the survey
  • Article in North Ken News.
  • Social media channels including Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Nextdoor.
  • Targeted Facebook adverts to North Ken residents.
  • The Council’s website and enewsletters to residents, voluntary and community organisations, faith organisations and resident associations.
  • Posters displayed at The Curve and on local estate noticeboards.
  • Electronic noticeboards on local estates.
  • A new dedicated Curve enewsletter for residents specifically signed up to receive Curve updates.
  • Suggestion box at The Curve for completed surveys.
  • Sharing content with community and voluntary sector partners to include in their channels.

You said

A total of 167 responses were received. The results indicated that the most popular preference was for ‘a Curve Legacy Fund, designed to fund projects that serve the North Kensington community’, with 30 per cent of respondents preferring this.

The second most popular choice, ‘another idea, developed and overseen by the Curve Legacy Steering Group’, was chosen by 22 per cent of respondents. Within that, the majority (but not all) respondents endorsed the Board of Governor’s proposal for a Community Trust.

A consistent theme, throughout the consultation period, was concern relating to the sustainability of the Curve legacy beyond the ending of the recovery strategy. The Community Trust option was considered a way that this could happen, whilst also ensuring greater community ownership over decision-making. 

We did

Based on the results of this consultation and the majority view, on 10 November 2021 the Council formally agreed to work with North Kensington communities to form a resident-led Curve Legacy Steering Group, who we will partner with to:

  • create a Curve Legacy Fund, designed to fund projects that serve the North Kensington community, based on their expressed needs and
  • form a Community Trust to oversee the Curve Legacy Fund. The Community Trust’s focus will also be to sustain the Curve Legacy after the five-year strategy has concluded in March 2024.

In addition 

After the consultation ended Kensington and Chelsea Council and The Curve Board of Governors held a public meeting to feedback to local North Kensington residents on 9 November 2021 as requested by the Curve Board of Governors. At this meeting the community was clear that in addition to the next steps for The Curve they want their own community space to be provided by Kensington and Chelsea Council in North Kensington. This was presented to the Leadership Team on 10 November 2021, the following was agreed: for Kensington and Chelsea Council to relook at the Community Asset Review that identifies Council buildings and commercial properties with a view to report back on the potential of local North Kensington spaces that could be made accessible for local community usage; this may include shared spaces.

We asked

This was their largest consultation to date with young people. Conversations were had with around 200 young people, 120 of those young people engaged with the survey and submitted responses. The aim for the “Your Voice” survey is to support and inform the work of the Youth Council, results will help shape their priorities to address our younger residents, their futures, current needs, and the impact of the global Covid-19 pandemic.

The consultation focused on young people's priorities.

You said

Young people's priorities for their local area and community

  • Respondents top three priorities for their local area and community in order of importance are education followed by mental/physical health and youth voice.

Youth services

  • A total of 42 per cent of respondents felt they do not have a say in how services are set up and run in their local area.

Education, careers advice, guidance, and support

  • A third of young people find it difficult to access work experiences, 44 per cent do not know where to look and 30 per cent expressing they have lack of connections.

Mental Health and wellbeing

  • A total of 43 per cent of respondents indicated they strongly agree with the following statement “I know what good mental health is”
  • One third (32%) “know where to get support for their mental health”

Physical Activity

  • Nearly half (47 per cent) of respondents did not use either Chelsea Leisure Centre or Kensington Leisure Centre

Safety

  • A total of (41 per cent) of respondents feel “providing young people with more things to do” would make them feel safer in their neighbourhood/area.

We did

The Youth Council are reviewing the findings from the survey and will use them to develop a six month plan for the Youth Council to focus on.

We asked

For your views on high streets in the borough, to understand what you like about your local or favourite high street and what you would like to see improved.

You said

Feedback that has been given can be viewed on the dedicated site for this project.

We did

The project team is taking into account all feedback gathered to create a set of high-level principles for our high streets. These principles will inform a draft toolkit with practical ideas for each area.

We asked

The Gambling Act 2005 requires all licensing authorities to prepare and publish a Gambling Act Statement of Policy and Principles every three years. A review of the current policy, which is due to expire in January 2022, took place. This will be our sixth Statement of Gambling Policy.

You said

All feedback was considered as part of the decision-making process.

We did

The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea has, in accordance with section 349 of the Gambling Act 2005, carried out its 3 year review of its Statement of Gambling Policy.

A total of five responses were received from Gosschalks Solicitors representing the Betting and Gaming Council (BGC), Legal Services, the Metropolitan Police, Fire Authority and the Council’s Noise and Nuisance Team.  A summary of all five responses and relevant amendments to the revised Statement of Gambling Policy is attached as Appendix B to the Policy.

The Statement was adopted by Full Council at its meeting on 1 December 2021 and in line with the statutory requirement it was published for 28 days before coming into effect on the 6 January 2022. 

If you have any enquiries regarding this Statement of Gambling Policy please contact the Licensing Team at: licensing@rbkc.gov.uk or by telephone on: 020 7341 5152

Help and support

If you or someone you know is struggling with gambling-related problems, contact the National Gambling Helpline.

0808 8020 133.

Free of charge, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

We asked

We asked for your views on the existing features within Avondale Park with the aim of making improvements throughout the park using the feedback and ideas from the local community. The consultation was split into three phases; Initial Ideas and Feedback, Focus Group Sessions and a formal survey. Idea and comments were condensed into categories which were the basis for the questions asked in the community wide survey – Accessibility, Health and Wellbeing, Education and Sustainability.

You said

Phase 1 (Initial Ideas and Feedback) – 160+ comments

Phase 2 (Focus Groups) – 6 local stakeholder groups

Phase 3 (Survey) – 154 responses

Outdoor Gym

  • Support for outdoor gym: The majority (77 per cent) of respondents supported the installation of a new outdoor gym at Avondale Park. A total of 15 per cent of respondents did not support the installation of a new outdoor gym.
  • Types of equipment to be included in the outdoor gym: A total of 37 per cent of respondents preferred a combination of calisthenics (body weight) and other fitness equipment. A total of 29 per cent preferred calisthenics equipment only, whilst 16 per cent preferred a variety of fitness equipment.
  • Support for installation of fencing around the outdoor gym: A total of 46 per cent of respondents supported the idea of installing fencing around the outdoor gym. Whilst 28 per cent of respondents did not support the installation of fencing around the outdoor gym. A total of 14 per cent of respondent selected don’t know.
  • Additional Features included: Suitable safety surfacing, clear instructions on how to use the equipment, and a good variety which takes into account all demographics.

Playgrounds

Junior Playground:

  • Satisfaction with current junior playground: A net total of 32 per cent (eight per cent very satisfied, 24 per cent satisfied) of respondents were satisfied with the current junior playground. A net total of 16 per cent (10 per cent dissatisfied, six per cent very dissatisfied) of respondents were dissatisfied with the current junior playground.
  • Preferred theme for junior playground proposals: A total of 49 per cent of respondents selected nature/wildlife theme to be included as part of the junior playground. Whilst 23 per cent of respondent selected both the jungle theme and the space theme, and 18 per cent selected underwater/pirate theme for the junior playground.
  • Type of material used for the junior playground proposals: A total of 56 per cent of respondents outlined they wanted wood/timber/natural to be used for the junior playground equipment. A total of 12 per cent of respondents selected metallic as the material to be used for the junior playground equipment.
  • Types of equipment included in junior playground proposals: A total of 45 per cent of respondents selected multiunit/climbing frames, and 44 per cent of all respondents selected balancing equipment, jumper/trampoline and swings. The least popular options were rocking/springer equipment (27 per cent) and sculpture features (20 per cent).

Senior Play Area:

  • Satisfaction with children’s larger play area: A net total of 33 per cent (eight per cent very satisfied, 25 per cent satisfied) of respondents were satisfied with the larger play area. A net total of 23 per cent (18 per cent dissatisfied, five per cent very dissatisfied) of respondents were dissatisfied with the current larger play area.
  • Supporting fencing around the children’s larger play area: A total of 34 per cent of respondents supported the idea of installing fencing around the larger play area. Whilst 36 per cent of respondents did not support the installation of fencing around the larger play area.
  • Views on surfacing the children’s larger play area: Nearly half (47 per cent) of respondents preferred to keep the current layout of the larger play area. Nearly a quarter (24 per cent) of respondents supported surfacing the whole of the larger play area.
  • Type of equipment in the children’s larger play area: Half (50 per cent) of respondents selected swings, 48 per cent selected multi-unit/climbing frames and 46 per cent selected zip-line. The least popular option was dynamic/spinning equipment (38 per cent), although this is still a high proportion of the survey respondents.

Open and Green Spaces:

Accessibility:

  • Most participants wanted improvements to both the existing seating areas and introducing new ones (36%).
  • Participants wanted more benches and picnic tables, with better accessibility features (especially around the larger playground area).
  • Benches/picnic tables which are more suitable for disabled users (benches with backs/armrest, tables disabled friendly, wooden).
  • Participants wanted to improve lighting throughout (inc. around the park buildings).
  • Requests to make entrances more disabled friendly (lower kerbs at the entrances down Walmer Road).
  • Improvements to areas of footpath in the park, along with the drainage.

Green Spaces:

  • Most participants supported the idea of introducing a community garden (43%).
  • Re-seed grass throughout where needed.
  • Popular planting ideas: edible plants, fruit trees, wildflowers, larger range of flowers.
  • General maintenance needs to improve.
  • Improve wildlife features: bird boxes, bug hotels etc.
  • Restore green roof on park buildings.
  • Improvements to the woodland wildlife trial, wild meadow areas and garden spaces.

Other:

  • Improvements to the service by the kiosk provider
  • Better signage throughout the park
  • History board
  • Restoration of the fountain

We did

The results will be used to help with the scope of the works and the initial master planning, and the Council will be working with the Avondale Park Steering Group and other sub groups to implement the works where possible.

We asked

We asked for your views on the existing features in Kensington Memorial Park with the aim of making improvements throughout the park using the feedback and ideas from the local community. The consultation was split into three phases; Initial Ideas and Feedback, Focus Group Sessions and a formal survey. Idea and comments have been split into categories according to the type of activity they represent – future of park buildings, sport and fitness facilities, other proposals and playground improvements.

You said

Future of park buildings:

  • Support for housing the café/kiosk in a new building near its existing location. The new building is also intended to house the sports changing rooms, public toilets, Changing Places toilet and grounds maintenance office. 50 per cent of respondents supported this proposal versus 36 per cent who supported housing the café/kiosk in the refurbished toilet block. 13 per cent of respondents did not support either of these options. 
  • No clear support for a preferred use for the refurbished toilet block. 40 per cent of respondents outlined that they did have a preferred use versus 60 per cent who said that they did not have a preferred use. Respondents who did not support either option were asked to provide alternative ideas and out of those 11 supported having the changing rooms next to the football pitch.
  • Out of the respondents who had another preferred use for the refurbished toilet block the top three responses were to refurbish into a well maintained toilet block (13 responses), transform into a café (10 responses) and extend the building to house changing rooms (9 responses).

Sport and fitness facilities:

  • Support for installing an outdoor gym with a mix of calisthenics and machine equipment near St Mark’s Road. 64 per cent of respondents supported this proposal versus 20 per cent against and 16 per cent who were neutral.
  • Support for modifying one of the tennis courts to include basketball nets and line markings. 57 per cent of respondents supported this proposal versus 24 per cent against and 19 per cent who were neutral.
  • Support for installing anti-glare spill floodlights around the tennis courts. 52 per cent of respondents supported this proposal versus 19 per cent against and 29 per cent who were neutral.
  • Support for installing a junior fitness circuit to replace teenager play items near St Mark’s Road. 50 per cent of respondents supported this proposal versus 22 per cent against and 29 per cent who were neutral.

Other proposals:

  • Support for installing a dog agility area in the picnic table area to the south of the tennis courts. 50 per cent of respondents supported this proposal versus 28 per cent against and 21 per cent who were neutral. 14 people also commented that dogs need to be able to use all space in the park.
  • There was no clear support for installing a new hard footpath around one of the grass areas. 47 per cent of respondents supported this proposal versus 32 per cent against and 21 per cent who were neutral.

Children’s playground improvements

Toddler Playground:

  • Satisfaction with current toddler playground: A net total of 45 per cent (6 per cent very satisfied, 39 per cent satisfied) of respondents were satisfied with the current junior playground. A net total of 22 per cent (19 per cent dissatisfied, 3 per cent very dissatisfied) of respondents were dissatisfied with the current toddler playground.
  • Types of equipment to include in toddler playground proposals: The most popular play options were swings, a slide and climbing. The least popular options were hanging, spinning and balancing.

Junior Playground:

  • Satisfaction with current junior playground: A net total of 44 per cent (9 per cent very satisfied, 35 per cent satisfied) of respondents were satisfied with the current junior playground. A net total of 22 per cent (19 per cent dissatisfied, 3 per cent very dissatisfied) of respondents were dissatisfied with the current junior playground.
  • Types of equipment to include in junior playground proposals: The most popular play options were a zip wire, climbing and swings. The least popular options were spinning, balancing and bouncing.

Shade and shelter from the elements in the children’s playground:

  • Support for providing shade and shelter. 82 per cent of respondents said they would like more areas that provide shade and shelter versus 13 per cent against.

We did

The results will be used to help with the scope and priority of the works and Council will be working to establish a Kensington Memorial Park Steering Group and other sub groups to prioritise and implement supported works where possible.

We asked

The Council’s Dedicated Service team has launched a wide-ranging consultation and review with bereaved and survivors to help shape the future of the Dedicated Service. The first phase of the consultation ran for nine weeks from 5 July to 5 September 2021. It was extended for three weeks to allow plenty of time for people to share their feedback with us. As part of the Phase One consultation, we communicated directly with bereaved and survivors by letter, email, WhatsApp and via Dedicated Service Workers and invited them to share their views with us through a comprehensive survey and in other ways (including workshops and drop-in sessions). Materials were available in all of the nine languages most commonly spoken by those who use the service.

You said

We heard extensive feedback from over 230 bereaved and survivors in this first phase, approximately 40 per cent of adults eligible for the service.

We did

We have now launched Phase Two of the review, which will run through October and early November 2021. As part of this, we have shared the findings from Phase One directly with all bereaved and survivors via letters, email, WhatsApp and on the Dedicated Service website. We have also set out some proposed next steps for further discussion and will be seeking feedback on the draft plans in a range of different ways, including an online feedback form and face-to-face drop-in events and workshops. We will use what we hear from bereaved and survivors in Phase Two to develop a final set of plans which we will ask the Leadership Team to consider at its meeting in December 2021.

We asked

The Council worked with The Powis Square Steering Group which comprised of local residents, ward Councillors and Council officers has been set-up to co-design improvements to the square. As part of this, children and young people shared their ideas and opinions about redesigning Powis Square Play Space. We asked:

•           What are your favourite things about the Powis Square Play Space?

•           What would you want included in the new play space?

You said

Your top 5 favourite things about Powis Square were basketball, swings, climbing frame, slide and monkey bars.  

The most popular responses when asked about what was missing from Powis Square play space were as follows:

  • Trampoline
  • More seating/ benches, picnic tables
  • Flowers and planting
  • Water play, and
  • Swings

Football, basketball, tennis and outdoor gym were the most popular responses for fitness activities in Powis Square.

We did

The results will be used to help with the scope of the works, and the council will be working with the community and Powis Square Steering Group to finalise the designs of the play area, ball court and amenity space within Powis Square.

We asked

We asked for your views on how we can best deliver on the five environmental and sustainability priorities and goals set out in the Council’s Green Plan:

  • Becoming carbon neutral and tackling climate change
  • Improving air quality
  • Tackling fuel poverty
  • Minimising waste
  • Protecting and enhancing biodiversity

The scale and pace required to deliver the Green Plan requires significant and bold action, and for everyone to be involved to build a greener borough and a sustainable future. We, therefore, asked you for your views and ideas on how we can work together on these issues in the borough. In particular, we sought your views to help the development, design, and delivery of new action plans for addressing these priorities, especially the climate emergency, air quality and biodiversity.

You said

A key message from the survey results was that there was a lack of awareness about the Council’s actions to tackle and address climate change and its effects. This, therefore, made it difficult for some of you to comment on how well you thought the Council was doing in this area. You felt that the most important things the Council could do to support you to reduce your carbon footprint were to provide financial incentives/subsidies/grants to reduce your carbon footprint, including making your home more efficient and to identify residents who are vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and ensure their homes are resilient. You felt that the best way for the Council to reduce its carbon footprint was to reduce waste and recycle more and install energy efficient and controlled street lighting. The majority of you recycle as much as possible but clear information on what can and can’t be recycled was one way you identified to encourage even more recycling.

Key actions you would like to see to improve air quality focussed on improving and installing more electric vehicle charging points whilst your biodiversity priorities included planting more wildflower areas for pollinators and provide opportunities for the community to get involved in supporting biodiversity.

In general, you supported a number of the Council’s green policies including a possible future ban on domestic wood burning, reduced cost for electric parking permits, the expansion of food waste collections, conversion of parking bays for al fresco dining and the planting of street trees in a small number of parking bays.

Overall, your top greening priorities were investment in existing parks and developing new parks and the Green Fund.

 

We did

Your feedback is being used to help develop, design, and deliver new action plans, especially for climate change, air quality and biodiversity. These will be consulted on again from late October to December and will include focus groups with some of you. Here are some examples of what will be included in these draft action plans in direct response to where you have expressed support for particular initiatives or where you have indicated a need for improvement:

  • Regular environmental communications with residents will be produced providing updates on what the Council is doing to be Carbon Neutral by 2030 and what support and advice is available for residents to reduce their carbon footprint.
  • An additional food waste collection is being introduced later in the year.
  • Recycling communications (the Council website and publications) will be reviewed to ensure they inform residents in a clear and concise way what can be recycled and how. 
  • We will apply for Defra funding to improve our understanding and impact of domestic wood burning on air quality and develop a behaviour change and awareness raising campaign to reduce emissions of PM2.5 from wood burning.
  • More wildflower areas will be planted in parks and housing estates to improve biodiversity.
  • Explore where additional street trees can be planted in parking bays.
  • Improve education, events, and volunteering opportunities for residents to access, engage and learn about nature.
  • Additional sites will be added to the Bee Superhighway.
  • Green Fund proposals and external funding bids are being developed to help make schools and other Council buildings more energy efficient.
  • Opportunities to improve the borough’s parks and open spaces are being progressed. Improvements are planned for Avondale Park, Kensington Memorial Park, Powis Square and Cremorne Gardens over the coming year.
  • Organise community Environmental Sustainability events during COP26.
  • Set up an Environmental Coalition for Kensington and Chelsea, which will include residents, leaders from the community, key institutions, and businesses.
  • Continue Green Doctors scheme and arrange home-energy visits for residents in fuel poverty.

We really appreciate the insight the Citizen’s Panel provided and would like to continue this discussion with residents, businesses and the wider community  to develop and deliver actions to deliver the Green Plan and a more sustainable and greener borough.

We asked

The Anti Social Behaviour (ASB) Nuisance Vehicles Public Spaces Protection Order (PSPO) has been in place for the last six years. We wanted to know how residents felt about the PSPO in terms of its success and also its failures. Over the six years, there has been a certain amount of ASB displacement beyond the original PSPO zone and so we sought feedback from residents across the entire borough, to understand if this ASB affected neighbourhoods outside of the current zone of Knightsbridge. Over the last year we also trialled acoustic CCTV cameras, which help officers obtain evidence of order breaches. Views were also sought in relation to the cameras and whether further roll out would be popular.

You said

More than 93 per cent of respondents strongly supported a PSPO to address ASB from vehicles and over 84 per cent back extending and expanding the PSPO to cover the entire borough and further use of the acoustic cameras was also supported. In total there were 473 responses to the survey in the consultation and it demonstrated that the ASB caused by a minority of drivers affects residents in a variety of areas across the borough.

We did

The new PSPO will launch in late November 2021 and will cover the entire borough. We have procured more acoustic cameras and will shortly have three in operation, with the potential to increase this to five. The cameras are demountable and can be moved to different locations when needed. These new and more robust arrangements, will go towards addressing the concerns of our residents.

We asked

For residents and stakeholders views on revised proposals for the site.

You said

Building heights

  • Two-thirds (66 per cent) ‘objected’ to the revised building heights.
  • A total of 14 per cent responded neutrally (neither supporting nor objecting) to the proposals.
  • A total of 12 per cent ‘supported’ the revised proposals.

Number of homes

Respondents were asked to comment on the revised proposals for 110 homes.

  • A total of 34 comments related to there being too many homes or not supporting the proposals.
  • Twelve comments related to concerns about infrastructure or facilities.
  • While 11 commented they would like to see a higher number/percentage of affordable/social rent homes.

New community space

From a list of choices, respondents ranked a health and wellness centre as their first choice for a new community space at the base of Trellick Tower, followed be a creative workspace.

Landscape provision

Respondents were asked to comment on the proposed landscape provision.

  • Fourteen commented against the landscape proposals.
  • However, 13 were in favour of the landscape proposals.

Ball court facilities

The most selected features that respondents would like to see in the ball court were: accessible to all users (43 per cent), improved lighting (41 per cent) and flexible for use by different sports (38 per cent).

 Graffiti provision

  • Half of respondents supported the proposal to retain existing graffiti walls as part of the landscape.
  • However, a quarter objected to this approach.
     

Trellick Garden

From a list of choices, respondents ranked new landscaping and trees and improved safety and security as their top choices for improvements for Trellick Garden.

Servicing

  • Nearly a third (31 per cent) ‘objected’ to the proposed access route.
  • A quarter (25 per cent) responded neutrally (neither supporting nor objecting).
  • Nearly a quarter (23 per cent) ‘supported’ the proposed access route.

We did

We have also recently held landscape design workshops so that local residents could make suggestions about how they would like the outdoor space at Edenham designed.

 All of the proposals will now be submitted to planning for approval later this year where residents will be able to formally comment.

We asked

We asked for views on how the ban on motor vehicles from entering the north-easternmost arm of Lennox Gardens (outside Knightsbridge School), between the north-eastern kerb-line of Lennox Gardens (north-westernmost arm) and the south kerb-line of Pont Street, between 7.45am and 9.15am and between 3.15pm and 4.45pm on Mondays to Fridays inclusive, was working in practice.

You said

We had no objections and 27 supporting scheme in Lennox Gardens for https://consult.rbkc.gov.uk/communities/school-streets-experimental-traffic-order-seven-sc/ and no objections or other comments received for https://consult.rbkc.gov.uk/communities/lennox-gardens-school-street/

We did

We have made this scheme permanent.

We asked

We asked for views on how the ban on motor vehicles from entering the southern west to east arm of Cadogan Gardens (outside Holy Trinity C of E Primary School), between the eastern kerb-line of Cadogan Gardens (eastern north to south arm) and the western kerb-line of Pavilion Road, between 8.45am and 9.15am and between 3.00pm and 3.40pm on Mondays to Fridays inclusive, was working in practice.

You said

We had no objections and 23 support for the scheme in Cadogan Gardens for https://consult.rbkc.gov.uk/communities/school-streets-experimental-traffic-order-seven-sc/ and no objections or other comments received for  https://consult.rbkc.gov.uk/communities/cadogan-gardens-school-street/

We did

We have made this scheme permanent.